Welcome to the unwound

“What if’s” keep us going, keep us off-center.  I don’t think of them as good or bad, just motivators, because they build the foundation for our worries and our creativity. Charlene Dietz, Scheme Stalker

Check out these older posts:

 

From the End to the Beginning: Saying Goodbye: Struggling with death is not only saying goodbye to a loved one, but knowing what used to be will never be again.

Happiness: Maybe happiness is the joy experienced in degrees and contrasted to not being happy.

Mysterious–Altruistic Children of the Amazon: Children, in many places, stretch out their little palms and beg, but not along the Amazon River in Brazil. These out-going happy ones are quick to engage and help.

Aging Fictional Protagonists: A dilemma:An online article in the WSJ on July 1, 2011, interviewed authors of crime/mystery books on their aging protagonists.  Check out how J. A. Jance, Sue Grafton, Michael Connelly, Lawrence Block, Lee Childs, and others may solve this problem. I think we need aging heroes to balance out our youth slanted society.

Elizabeth Gilbert’s TED Talk-Secrets about Artists and Geniuses:  (Video glitch now corrected)  You’ll never look at your creativity in the same way again.  What a terrific remedy for dispelling that critic who nags in your head about your work.

Two TEDs every writer needs to know: One TED pours out ideas and prods you to think beyond, the other TED offers services to make your work shine.

Perception Video Quizzes: Hang on, if you haven’t seen this before you’ll be dumbfounded.  This is from one of the most significant little studies of the brain in the last few years and you get a chance to check it out with your own brain.

The Talk–The Time: A little word play: Is our language in transition?

Frog LeapTest: Test your divergent- problem solving skills.

Bookish: It’s a direct response to Amazon’s ability to survey the reading public’s preferences and more, by three leading publishing houses.  These three haven’t launched Bookish yet, but they want you to answer a question for their survey. 

Vonnegut’s video: Writing humor on story plots.

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